Wednesday, October 29, 2014

When A Mother's Kiss No Longer Heals Wounds


 Definitely, the highlight of his fall break: raking leaves for three plus hours!  His expression mirrors his excitement over the whole experience!


We surprised dear friend Erin with a 40th birthday overnighter.  Love that I captured her excitement and surprise!


Sweets for the sweet birthday girl!


Thirty-five years of friendship flew by.  I love her more every year!

Five-year-old Collin raced into the room clutching his knee. Tears streamed down his face.  

He whimpered, "I hit the wall."

I pulled him into my lap and inspected the slight scrapes that covered his knee cap.  As my doctor-husband says, it was a "Drama One:" an injury heavy on emotion, and light on injury. 

"Do you want me to kiss it," I murmured.

Between sobs, he cried, "Kissing doesn't help it!"

I couldn't help but laugh, but then I reflected on the magnitude of his statement: he no longer believes kisses heal wounds.

When a child no longer believes in the healing touch of a kiss, he or she has graduated to a new phase of childhood.  Gone are the days of picture books, PBS shows, Megablocks, and naps.  The child has moved onto comic books, superhero shows, Minecraft, and sports teams.

When a child no longer believes in the healing touch of a kiss, hand holding is unwelcome; independence is craved.

When a child no longer believes in the healing touch of a kiss, mothers become supportive cast members; friends reign supreme.

And so I greeted Collin's words with a bit of sadness.  I pulled out a bandaid and attached it to Collin's knee.  His tears slowed, and he jumped off my lap and raced outside to play.

The bandaid soothed the injury, not a mother's kiss.  It's a realization every child will have, but at that moment, it's the mother who feels a bit wounded.   



No comments:

Post a Comment